GFIA Home

Order
Guinea
Decals

Color Chart

GFIA
Latest News

GFIA Articles &
Activities Index

Find us on Facebook

Training a dog to leave the guineas alone (General Discussion)

by Trillium, Thursday, July 06, 2017, 09:24 (49 days ago)

I love my dog. He's 1.5 years old, and well-trained overall. He's great around people and other dogs (he even volunteers as a therapy dog), but he can't seem to shake his instinct to chase the guineas. As far as I can tell, he's not trying to hurt them, he just wants to play. I've tried a few things, and I think he's better than he used to be. But he's still not great, and I'm afraid I'll never be able to let him out in the yard when they start free-ranging or he'll scatter them into the woods.

Any advice on how to train a dog not to chase your birds? He's a standard poodle. Smart as can be, but oh, that energy!

This excerpt from one of HeritageHens' posts might help

by Barbara, Thursday, July 06, 2017, 22:18 (48 days ago) @ Trillium

HeritageHens said:

I have trained my Standard Poodle puppy to respect the Guineas and chickens. She does not really guard them, except to let me know if a strange animal comes onto the property. She does not chase deer or wild turkeys, but watches them intently. When she was a small puppy she wanted to chase and play with the birds, so I had to break her of that. It took a lot of patience with her on a lead, walking near them when they were in their run, then aways off when they free ranged. Little by little our walks got closer and closer, so that we could actually walk through the flock or the barn without her lunging at them. Now she can be loose with them out and only occasionally will jump back and forth in front of a Guinea fowl to try to tease it to play, as she does with our cats, but she would not grab one.

Avatar

This excerpt from one of HeritageHens' posts might help

by service1010, Tucson AZ, Thursday, July 06, 2017, 23:12 (48 days ago) @ Barbara

I never let my dogs with my guineas unless they were leashed. I used the 'leave it' command. They finally understood.

Now, the dogs and the guineas are often on the front porch together!

It's really very similar to training a dog not to chase your cat (if you have one)

Takes time and patience.

This excerpt from one of HeritageHens' posts might help

by Trillium, Saturday, July 08, 2017, 12:45 (46 days ago) @ service1010

I don't have cats or any other animals, so this is new territory for me. I use "leave it" too, but so far it's a toss up whether he'll listen or have to be dragged away from the coop. He's a good, smart dog, but sometimes he gets too excited and just seems to lose his mind! We'll keep working, and hopefully he'll figure it out.

Avatar

This excerpt from one of HeritageHens' posts might help

by service1010, Tucson AZ, Saturday, July 08, 2017, 15:14 (46 days ago) @ Trillium

He WILL figure it out (with your guidance!)

You have to be focused on him so that at the very first sign of interest, you use the 'leave it' command. I you wait until he is fixated, or moving forward towards the guineas, you have lost your window

Avatar

img: This excerpt from one of HeritageHens' posts might help

by service1010, Tucson AZ, Saturday, July 08, 2017, 15:22 (46 days ago) @ service1010

This excerpt from one of HeritageHens' posts might help

by Trillium, Saturday, July 08, 2017, 12:36 (46 days ago) @ Barbara

Thank you! I'm happy to work with him (like I said, he's generally well-trained already), but I haven't been sure what direction to go. I don't mind taking the time, as long as I'm not wasting my time, you know? If I'm not doing it right, it's just going to be frustrating for both of us.

According to Cindy, "Yes, it can be done."

by Barbara, Thursday, July 06, 2017, 23:51 (48 days ago) @ Trillium

She also says:

Walk on a leash with treats handy. Anytime the dog looks away from the birds, praise & treat. Anytime he shows the least bit of interest in them, leash-jerk and "No!" Depending on the dog and the level of prey-drive, it may take a few weeks, or a few months.

img: Training a dog to leave the guineas alone

by kim ⌂, Pontotoc, TX, Saturday, July 08, 2017, 06:56 (47 days ago) @ Trillium
edited by kim, Saturday, July 08, 2017, 13:06

[image]

I take my dogs into the stall with me. A Lab, French Bull Dog, and a Blue Lacey. We sit there and watch the keets and they get the idea, they're not for eating. The keets have become used to them and will come right up to us while seeking more treats. Sure they're interested but they already know that no means no. When the keets are let out in another month, they'll leave them alone, well they won't eat them. They already take care of any predator they see, my guess is there will be a protective relationship like with the barn cat and house cat. Same process, we sat with them and told them no as the kittens launched themselves at tails, paws, and faces...... not for eating!

Training a dog to leave the guineas alone

by Trillium, Saturday, July 08, 2017, 12:12 (46 days ago) @ kim

Very cute pup you have!

Thank you. I don't have any cats or other animals, so this is just something I haven't had to train him about before. We sometimes get rabbits, deer, etc. around, but of course I don't have a problem with him chasing them off.

Training a dog to leave the guineas alone

by ChrisCT, Saturday, July 08, 2017, 09:54 (47 days ago) @ Trillium

I have successfully gotten all my dogs to see my birds as "part of the family" (some easier than others).

The hardest of which we ended up (after she actually grabbed, but did not hurt, one of them) using a shock collar with a remote. When she alerted to them, we shouted NO! When she lunged we shouted NO! and gave her a shock. It worked pretty quickly...

She was that only one we had to go that far with, I think because she was older, like yours. Puppies are easier but, a lot of it has to do with their desire too. I have had mostly Great Danes, the latest was a rescue Pitbull puppy and the easiest of any of them. We've also got her to totally ignore the Bunnies in our yard. She kills woodchucks, chases squirrels and chipmunks, but is aware that the bunnies get a "pass" in the backyard (you know, because of that Nose ;).

Quite remarkably, this same dog killed a RedTail Hawk! I'm not sure how, I didn't witness the take-down, but she "gets" the concept that the Hawks are the enemy we battle weekly with scare cartridges. The only scenario I can come up with is that this hawk dove on a squirrel she was charging (she laying-in-wait behind the hawks location). Maybe they met at the same point and she Won! But I found her barking at it as it tried to get away with a broken wing in the middle of the backyard. She's the most protective of my birds, alerts to hawks in the air when they do and runs to them when They alert.

Ebay has these remote training collars very inexpensively.

Training a dog to leave the guineas alone

by Trillium, Saturday, July 08, 2017, 12:33 (46 days ago) @ ChrisCT

I'll definitely look into the shock collars. We used a wireless fence system to train him to stay in the acre around the house. He was totally trained in a week. I've often wished we could use it to keep him away from the guineas, but they're well within his range. I hadn't realized there were options like that.

I LOVE Great Danes! That's what we originally wanted, but my husband hates the thought of any shedding at all. So we got a poodle instead, and luckily enough he's an unusually tall poodle.

RSS Feed of thread
powered by my little forum